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Jealousy & Envy

Having read both of the aforementioned books this is an excellent blog thank you for sharing it with us Maria 🙂

gibbsdream

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I had decided on this blog thinking I was writing about jealousy only with envy being a synonym but after doing some research I discovered something I hadn’t known which is that jealousy and envy are considered to  be different.

Dictionary definitions:

Jealousy: feeling or showing an envious resentment of someone or their achievements, possessions, or perceived advantages.

Envy: a feeling of discontented or resentful longing aroused by someone else’s possessions, qualities, or luck.

The dictionary would suggest that both these emotions are the same but some psychologists differentiate between the two emotions:

Jealousy is relationship based and involves a third person. It’s an emotion that makes a person fear for their relationship with another – partner, parent, friend etc… The person sees a threat to their relationship which could be real or perceived.

Example: Your husband has a female friend and you see that friendship in a different light…

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Close Reading: How to Read a Poem

An interesting read on how to ‘read poetry’ it is slightly longer than I expected so make sure you have time before starting it.

Interesting Literature

Some tips for the close reading of poetry

‘Close reading’ is not as straightforward as it may appear. Many readers of poetry, for instance, may have encountered ‘close readings’ of poems which are anything but. They’re not so much ‘close’ as ‘at arm’s length’. How do you close-read a poem? F. R. Leavis was one of the most influential literary critics writing in English in the twentieth century. Yet he often claimed he was performing a ‘close reading’ of a poem which was actually, at best, a sort of flirtatious dalliance with the words and meaning of the text.

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#Sharing Sue Vincent’s Blog

There was still a little time before my son had to be at the station… time enough simply to drive, showing him some of the places I love, places that call me home to a place I have yet to live. I am a Yorkshire lass, but the hills know no border, no boundary line. […]

via Snakes and peacocks — Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

The Passionate Shepherd to His Love

I absolutely love rhyming poetry and so glad I found this lovely little blog 🙂

Rhyme

Come live with me and be my love,
And we will all the pleasures prove
That valleys, groves, hills, and fields,
Woods, or steepy mountain yields.

And we will sit upon the rocks,
Seeing the shepherds feed their flocks,
By shallow rivers to whose falls
Melodious birds sing madrigals.

And I will make thee beds of roses
And a thousand fragrant posies,
A cap of flowers, and a kirtle
Embroidered all with leaves of myrtle;

A gown made of the finest wool
Which from our pretty lambs we pull;
Fair lined slippers for the cold,
With buckles of the purest gold;

A belt of straw and ivy buds,
With coral clasps and amber studs:
And if these pleasures may thee move,
Come live with me, and be my love.

The shepherds’ swains shall dance and sing
For thy delight each May morning:
If these delights thy mind may move,
Then…

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Blood on the Snow

A great review check it out 🙂

The Written Word

Synopsis

Winter, 1794, Flanders, and the British are retreating.

Faced by appalling weather and pursued by an overwhelming enemy, the very survival of the British Army is at stake.

With little supplies and ammunition, Lieutenant Jack Hallam of the 28th Regiment must prove himself by leading his company through the full horrors of the withdrawal, where morale is desperately low, and where looting and ill-discipline are rife.

The men must endure freezing temperatures, disease and battle if they wish to see home again, and if any officer can accomplish this feat, then that man is Jack Hallam.

Blood on the Snow is a gripping tale of honour, bravery and self-sacrifice in the darkest of times.

Fight not for glory, but to survive.

__________

Review

The third installment in David Cook’s The Soldier Chronicles, Blood on the Snow is a harrowing tale of war, bravery, duty, and camaraderie. Cook packs a…

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