#NaPoWriMo Day 11

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National Poetry Writing Month Day 11

Our optional prompt for today is based on another poem of Elhillo’s, calledOrigin Stories.” Like “To Make Use of Water,” this poem struggles to make sense of the distance between the poet’s beginnings, her point of origin, and her present self. Have you ever heard the phrase,you can’t go home again?” This poem is about that.

Today, taking a leaf from Elhillo’s work, we’d like to challenge you to write a poem of origin. Where are you from? Not just geographically, but emotionally, physically, spiritually? Maybe you are from Vikings and the sea and diet coke and angry gulls in parking lots. Maybe you are from gentle hills and angry mothers and dust disappearing down an unpaved road. And having come from there, where are you now?

Happy (or at the very least, emotionally engaged) writing!

Chaos and Destruction

Click the image to enlarge (opens in a new window for ease of reading)

190411 Chaos & Destruction

Image from beate bachmann Pixabay

Chaos and Destruction

I come from chaos
from gas, from air, an explosion,
– a creation of worlds.

I come from love,
from joy, a bonding of cultures,
– a union of worlds.

I am here now ashamed,
saddened, to be part of the slow
– destruction of worlds.

Copyright © April 2019 Rose English

 

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#NaPoWriMo Day 10

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National Poetry Writing Month Day 10

Today, I’d like to challenge you to write a poem that starts from a regional phrase, particularly one to describe a weather phenomenon. You may remember one from growing up, bu if you’re having trouble getting started, perhaps one of these regional U.S. phrases used to describe warm weather will inspire you. Or you might enjoy these French terms for cold weather, or even these expressions from the British Isles that are mostly for the very British phenomenon of rain.

Happy writing!

Weather in the North of the UK (W.I.P.)

There’s nowt so queer as folk,
and this our British weather.
Sometimes hot and sometimes cold,
and sometimes both together.

Well it’s nice weather for the ducks,
but it’s been a little parky
now tha berra watch thissen,
cos it’s turning mother snarky.

Bloomin’ eck the weather’s turned
it’s hammering tooth and nail,
There’s a hole in t’roof, but it’ll be all reight
We’ll catch the watter in our sturdy tin pail.

Work in Progress – unfinished

Terms from up north (UK),  generally Yorkshire areas

Parky = cold, chilly
Berra = better watch out
Thissen = yourself
Snarky = sullen or moody
Bloomin’ eck = exclamation of shock and surprise
Hammering tooth and nail = happening violently, torrential rain
T’ roof = in the roof
All reight = everything will be OK
Watter = water
Pail =bucket
Copyright © April 2019 Rose English

Thank You for visiting

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#NaPoWriMo Day 09

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National Poetry Writing Month Day 09

Today’s prompt inspired by the work of Sei Shonagon, a Japanese writer who lived more than 1000 years ago. She wrote a journal that came to be known as The Pillow Book. The challenge to write your own Sei Shonagon-style list of “things.” What things? Well, that’s for you to decide!

Happy writing!

UK Mini Break -Whatever the Weather

Day 09 UK Mini BreakOpens in a new link

Image by Jordan Stimpson Pixabay

Listen on Sound Cloud

UK Mini Break (Whatever the weather)

Will it be hot?
Or will it be cold?
Should I pack a bikini?
Dare I be so bold?
Open toe sandals?
or boots lined with fur
Hell if I know,
do I really care.
Sundress each day,
or jeans and a jumper?
Sexy black nighty,
or PJs for slumber?
Sunglasses and sun cream,
or a sturdy umbrella?
Will I need shoes for dancing?
Or just kindle novellas?
I won’t need my passport,
I’m not going far.
A visit up north,
to relax in the spa.
We’ll walk over hills,
whatever the weather.
This short mini break,
bringing family together.

Copyright © April 2019 Rose English

Thank You for visiting

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#NaPoWriMo Day 08

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The prompt for the day (optional, as always), is inspired by Maggie Smith’s poem. You may have noted that the central metaphor of “Good Bones” turns on a phrase used by real estate agents. Today, I’d like to challenge you to think about the argot of a particular job or profession, and see how you can incorporate it into a metaphor that governs or drives your poem. This rather astonishing list of professional slang terms might help you get into the mood. Or, if you work a white-collar job, perhaps you can take inspiration from one of the business jargon phrases that seem to predominate in corporate environments (leveraging diverse synergies, anyone?)

Happy writing!

Good Bones by Maggie Smith

Maggie Smith, “Good Bones” from Waxwing magazine. Copyright © 2016 by Maggie Smith. Filmmaker Anaïs La Rocca

Visit Motion Poems to see the words click HERE

My Poem to follow later

Don’t know if I am able to do something with this one today. Have to come back to it

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#NaPoWriMo Day 07

2019 National Poetry Writing Month Challenge Day 07

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The prompt for the day (optional, as always) is inspired by McKibbens, who posted these thoughts on her Twitter account a few months back:

What do you deserve? Name it. All of it. What are you ready to let go of? Name that too. Then name the most gentle gift for yourself. Name the brightest song your body’s ever held. Summon joy like you would a child; call it home. It wanders, yes. But it’s still yours.

Today, we’d like to challenge you to write a poem of gifts and joy. What would you give yourself, if you could have anything? What would you give someone else?

A Pleiades Poem

Pleiades Poem

I am dabbling with a new poetry form the Pleiades poem, named after the Seven Sisters star cluster. It has a one-word title, seven lines, and every line starts with the same letter as the title. Each line should contain six syllables. Click the image above to visit the Writers’ Greenhouse for more info.

Click the image below to read the poem more clearly (Opens in a new window)

Day 07 GiftsImage by Annca from Pixabay

Gifts

Giving of a gift is
gratifying, brings joy,
generates happiness.
Goodwill reaps kindness and
grants fulfilment to the gift
giver. A kind-hearted soul
gains contentment and peace.

Copyright © April 2019 Rose English

Thank you for visiting.

Happy writing!

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#NaPoWriMo Day 7 examples

WOW Day 07 is bringing up some very powerful poems check this out by Small Burdens and try and make time to watch the video at the end. Poetry as Therapy: Rachel McKibbens.

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Small Burdens

This poem, for day 7 of NaPoWriMo, is a direct response to Rachel McKibbens’ Twitter post, here:

“What do you deserve? Name it. All of it. What are you ready to let go of? Name that too. Then name the most gentle gift for yourself. Name the brightest song your body’s ever held. Summon joy like you would a child; call it home. It wanders, yes. But it’s still yours.”

Why?
When I consider naming what I deserve
Does my diaphragm draw up
Pushing tears
Into the corners of my eyes.
I deserve a more joyful visceral response for my deepest longing

I keep thinking
I deserve a normal life
Where I pay my bills on time and drive a reliable car
But maybe what I actually deserve is the the kind of joyful-mess
That doesn’t cause me to squander my prayers
On such normalities

I let go of
Simultaneously…

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Villanelle “Romantic Spirits Intoxicating Our Senses” by David Ellis

I’m rather enjoying the Day 05 Villanelle poems for the #NaPoWriMo challenge I spotted this by David Ellis and simply had to share. “Romantic Spirits Intoxicating Our Senses” by David Ellis from 2017 Visit David’s blog link below to hear him read the poem.

Romantic Spirits Intoxicating Our Senses by David Ellis

The electric thrills of your kisses collide with such divine force
Yet gentle grace, my perceptions of this world will never be the same again
All-consuming are these moments, ravished by passionate thoughts

Romantic spirits, intoxicating to our senses from the core to the source
Sweeter than shared strawberries, dipped in the finest champagne
The electric thrills of your kisses collide with such divine force

You are the quiet reflections found in books, the most enticing of all plots
Your language is all your own, an elegant quill inking ideas in golden rain
All-consuming are these moments, ravished by passionate thoughts

Strength of character and courage under fire leads to a desire overdose
Gorgeous, grounded and gifted, you sparkle in ways invoking euphoric élan
The electric thrills of your kisses collide with such divine force

Indulgence of inspiring minds once separated, now focused and on course
Genuine warmth, vibrant excitement, mere words never come close enough to explain
All-consuming are these moments, ravished by passionate thoughts

There is no caution to the wind or choice of remorse
Your tenderness is ruthless, with you, life is anything but mundane
The electric thrills of your kisses collide with such divine force
All-consuming are these moments, ravished by passionate thoughts

toofulltowrite (I've started so I'll finish)

Hello and welcome to all of the poetry action you can ever handle! (And then some)

It’s Day Fourteen of NanoPoblano AKA National Blog Posting Month (but with a really big serving suggestion of Cheer Peppers!) and I’m back with yet another video to bring joy to the masses.

Check out the Facebook Live performance of my latest poem.

My inspiration for this particular poem came in the form of a style called a ‘villanelle’ (which sounds suspiciously to me like a saucy young french female villain but of course it isn’t that at all, which is a shame, as I needed an excuse to brush up on my French).

The composition of a villanelle consists of five tercets (stanzas of three lines) followed by a final quatrain (which is four lines long).

(Also these terms sound far too much like gym routines for comfort and have already got me sweating…

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